The Southern Ocean is Still Swallowing Large Amounts of Humans’ Carbon Dioxide Emissions

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    Southern ocean taking in CO2
    An iceberg on the waters of the Southern Ocean under a stormy grey sky.

    Introduction: The Southern Ocean’s Role in the Global Carbon Cycle

    The Southern Ocean is responsible for absorbing and storing about a quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) that humans release into the atmosphere. As CO2 levels rise, it becomes harder for plants to absorb the gas, making it more challenging to grow.

    The Southern Ocean is home to a large amount of carbon in the form of CO2 gas dissolved in seawater and other greenhouse gases like methane and nitrous oxide. As CO2 levels rise, it becomes harder for plants to absorb this gas, making it more challenging to grow. This means that ocean acidification directly impacts global climate change and its effects on marine life.

    How is the Climate Changing in the Southern Ocean?

    The Southern Ocean is a vast expanse of water that covers about one-third of Earth’s surface, it is the largest ocean on the planet and is located in the Antarctic region.
    The climate in this area has been changing rapidly due to global warming and ocean acidification. As a result, many species migrate from their natural habitats to find new ones that can sustain them.

    The Southern Ocean plays a vital role in regulating global climate patterns, providing nutrients for plankton growth, and regulating carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

    What are the Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Life in the Southern Ocean?

    The Southern Ocean is the largest body of water globally, covering an area of nearly 14 million square kilometers. It is also one of the most important ecosystems on Earth.
    Climate change has been a long-term threat to marine life in the Southern Ocean. The effects that climate change has had on marine life have been seen across many different areas, including changes in habitat and distribution.

    The impacts that climate change has had on marine life are not just limited to physical changes. There are also social and economic impacts that have been seen, such as the changes to fisheries and tourism industries throughout Antarctica.

    Why is the Southern Ocean Important to Protect?

    The Southern Ocean is the ocean that surrounds Antarctica; and it is the world’s largest body of water and has a significant impact on our planet’s climate.

    The Southern Ocean plays a crucial role in regulating global temperatures and carbon dioxide levels and providing food for over half of the world’s fish species. The Southern Ocean is also home to unique creatures such as penguins, whales, seals, and sea turtles.

    It is also essential for marine life to be able to migrate from one side of the ocean to another without being blocked by barriers such as continents or islands.

    Conclusion: How Can We Protect our Sea Life and Reduce Carbon Emissions?

    The southern ocean is a vast expanse of water that covers more than three-quarters of the Earth’s surface. It is home to the Antarctic krill, penguins, and whales.
    The southern ocean is home to some of the most diverse sea life on earth, and it also plays a crucial role in global carbon cycles. However, due to climate change, overfishing and pollution, it has been threatened by several factors.

     

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